Rochester Orthopedic Laboratories -- A Tradition of Quality Orthotic and Prosthetic Care
Rochester Orthopedic Laboratories -- A Tradition of Quality Orthotic and Prosthetic Care About UsProducts & ServicesMeet Our StaffFAQsContact UsHome
FAQs




What is an orthotist/prosthetist?

 An orthotist provides care to patients with congenital, traumatic, neurological, and/or neuromuscular disabling conditions of the body's musculoskeletal structure by evaluating, designing, fabricating, fitting and aligning braces known as orthoses. At the request of, and in conjunction with, physicians, the orthotist assists in formulating prescriptions for orthoses and examines the patients' orthotic needs in relation to their functional loss. In providing an orthosis, the orthotist is responsible for formulating its design and selecting materials and components; making all necessary casts, measurements, model modifications, and layouts; performing fittings, including static and dynamic alignments; evaluating the orthosis on the patient; instructing the patient in its use; and maintaining patient records—all in conformity with the prescription. The Orthotist is expected to keep abreast of new developments concerning patient care.

 A prosthetist provides care to patients with partial or total absence of a limb by evaluating, designing, fabricating, fitting and aligning artificial limbs known as prostheses. At the request of, and in conjunction with, physicians, the prosthetist assists in formulating prescriptions for prostheses and examines and evaluates the patients' prosthetic needs in relation to the functional loss. In providing a prosthesis, the prosthetist is responsible for formulating its design and selecting materials and components; making all necessary casts, measurements, model modifications, and layout; performing fittings, including static and dynamic alignments; evaluating the prosthesis on the patient; instructing the patient in its use; and maintaining patient records—all in conformity with the prescription. The prosthetist is expected to keep abreast of new developments concerning prosthetic patient care.

Return to Top



Are the practitioners certified?

 All of our practitioners are certified by the American Board for Certification (ABC). Our facility is accredited by the American Board for Certification.

Return to Top



What is HIPAA and how does it affect me?

 HIPAA stands for Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996. It became effective April 14, 2003. The goal is to improve the efficiency in health care delivery by standardizing electronic data interchange and by protecting the confidentiality and security of health care data. It gives patients more control over their health information by allowing them to find out how their information may be used and what disclosures have been made of their information; limiting the release of patient health information to the minimum amount needed for the purpose of the disclosure; and giving patients the right to examine and obtain a copy of their own health records and to request corrections. This act establishes safeguards that health care providers must use to protect the privacy of health information (information generated in our office and information we receive from outside sources). There will be very detailed paperwork for patients to fill out, and all of our patients will receive the Notice of Privacy Practices from us.

Return to Top



Do I need a prescription?

 All new patients should have a prescription before they are seen and should bring that prescription to their appointment. Per insurance requirements, we are required to have a detailed prescription for every adjustment/repair/appliance that is completed. If you are coming in for an adjustment appointment and do not have a prescription, one will have to be obtained. If it has been a long time since you last saw your physician, they may want to see you before you come to our office.

Return to Top



Do I need a referral?

 A prescription is usually enough for most insurance companies; however, you should call your insurance company to verify. Often for orthotics and prosthetics, prior authorization may be required rather than a referral; however, there are some insurance companies that need a referral in order for your appliance to be covered.

Return to Top



Do I need to make an appointment?

 We request that all patients make appointments because practitioners are often out of the building for hospital visits or clinics, and we want to make sure that your practitioner is available to see you when you come.

Return to Top



Why can't I just pick up my device?

 An orthosis or prosthesis is a custom product. We need to determine that it is fitting and functioning appropriately. We also need to explain proper care and use for each device.

Return to Top



How long does each appointment last?

 Our appointment times vary in length depending on what you are being seen for. If you have another engagement following your appointment at our facility, please let our office staff know when you are scheduling your appointment with us so that it will not interfere with your other engagement.

Return to Top



What do I need to bring to my first appointment?

 If you are a new patient, you should bring your prescription, X-rays where applicable, your insurance cards, and any worker's compensation or no-fault information (if applicable). Any time your doctor gives you a prescription, it should be brought to your appointment.

Return to Top



Will my insurance cover this?

 Every insurance policy is different. Coverage depends on what riders and plans your policy has. Coverage also depends on what the insurance company's "allowable" is. There may be instances when some items are not covered through your insurance or times we simply cannot accept the insurance company's allowable because it does not cover our costs. We quote our patients at the first appointment and we can call the insurance companies to check coverage for the specific orthosis/prosthesis needed.

Return to Top



Will you bill my insurance company?

 We will bill most insurance companies; however, certain insurance companies require that providers are "participating." If we are not a participating provider, they may have different rules for who can submit the bill to them. If you are unsure of whether we are a participating provider, you can call your insurance company or our office and we will be happy to assist you.

Return to Top



How much does an orthosis/prosthesis cost?

 It is difficult to estimate how much an orthosis or prosthesis will cost without seeing the patient in our office. We recommend that you set up an appointment for evaluation/casting. Each prosthesis or orthosis is designed for the individual patient. The style and componentry chosen will determine the total price. After the patient has been evaluated, we will be able to give you the cost, and will be able to call your insurance company to check coverage for the specific device you are being seen for. There is no charge for the evaluation appointment.

Return to Top



What is your office co-pay?

 There is no set co-pay for office visits. Your initial evaluation, casting/measurement, delivery, and checkups or adjustments in the first 90 days are covered in the cost of the appliance. Repairs and adjustments completed after the warranty period is over are charged on a time and materials basis.

Return to Top



Do you have a warranty?

 Rochester Orthopedic Laboratories, Inc., warrants each custom prosthetic and orthotic device to be free from defective workmanship and/or parts, under normal service and use, for three months (90 days) from the delivery date. Follow-up visits, adjustments, and repairs due to normal wear and tear are covered in the three-month warranty.

 This warranty does not apply to items or parts not manufactured by Rochester Orthopedic Laboratories, Inc. Items and parts that are manufactured by outside companies or vendors are warranted for the length of the manufacturer's warranty. Examples of such items include prosthetic socks, skin coverings, knee units, prosthetic feet, undersleeves, and Coolmax shirts. This warranty may not apply to adjustments needed due to a change in the patient's physical condition or functional ability.

 The warranty becomes void if the device has been adjusted, repaired, or altered by anyone other than an employee of Rochester Orthopedic Laboratories, Inc., or if the device or any of its parts have been subjected to misuse, neglect, or accident.

Return to Top



How long will it take for me to get my device?

 It will depend on the nature of your device. Your practitioner should be able to let you know the estimated time frame of completion after your first appointment.

Return to Top



When do I wear or use my device?

 When you use your device is determined by each individual's circumstances. You will need to follow instructions given by your practitioner or physician.

Return to Top



What should I do if my skin is red after I remove my device?

If the redness does not go away in the amount of time that you and your practitioner discussed, usually 15-20 minutes, please call the office for an appointment or ask to speak with your practitioner.

Return to Top



What should I do if I start to have problems with my device (e.g., it breaks, needs something replaced due to normal wear and tear, or needs an adjustment)?

If you begin to experience problems with your device, please call our office as soon as possible to either set up an adjustment appointment or to speak with your practitioner.

Return to Top



How often will my device require maintenance?

 Most devices do not have a set maintenance schedule; however, certain componentry requires routine maintenance. If any of your components require a maintenance schedule, your practitioner will go over this with you. If your device is broken or you need adjustments, please call our office for an appointment right away, even if it is before your already-scheduled appointment.

Return to Top



How do I know when to adjust my socks?

 The patient and the prosthetist will discuss proper sock fit at your delivery appointment. This information will be re-explained or reiterated at all checkups. Keep in mind that you should have even distribution of pressure, and that checking your amputation regularly will guide you in your sock changes—either more or less frequent. Paying attention to how your prosthesis goes on, movement in the socket while walking, and where you feel support will also help you decide if a change needs to be made. If you have questions or concerns, don't hesitate to call your prosthetist or schedule an appointment.

Return to Top



How long will I have this prosthesis?

 This depends on how long your prosthesis is fitting and functioning appropriately. As your amputation changes, following surgery and delivery of the prosthesis, your prosthesis will be adjusted with pads and socks to maintain a proper fit. Over time, the amputation will become significantly different in shape and size, and at that time the prosthesis may need to be replaced. Typically, your first prosthesis needs to be replaced between six–twelve months. (Different manufacturers have different component warranties, and may require replacement in a set amount of time.)

Return to Top



How long will I have this orthosis?

 An orthosis could last many years; however, there are many different factors over time that can influence the longevity of an device. How many moving parts does it have? How many steps a day do you take? What are your biomechanics like? What is your height and weight? Do you perform proper maintenance on your orthosis? Will you maintain your current weight and size? These are some of the factors involved.

Return to Top



How long will a child's AFO last?

 The average pediatric AFO can be worn successfully for approximately a year, but it may be shorter or longer depending on his/her growth pattern.

Return to Top


 
  Copyright © 2017 by Rochester Orthopedic Laboratories, Inc.  Website Designed by LogicalSolutions.net